If you are looking for a way to get data that is displayed on a website and save it to a Google Sheet every <some time interval>—because a record number of cmd+x and cmd+v keystrokes aren’t really the stats that resonate with you and your friends—please, read on.

An example problem:

In January 2020, Los Angeles County’s Department of Public Health started publishing Coronavirus data specific to Los Angeles County at http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/Coronavirus/locations.htm. Every day the numbers are updated providing a snapshot of the current status.

A screen capture from 03/18/2020 showing 190 cases, and 1 death were reported in Los Angeles County


You don’t need to know exactly what should be done, but you need to know where you want to go

For over 10 years I have been translating ideas into visuals for print and screens. I have worked on projects ranging from promo material for campaigns, to videos, to fine art, to websites. Sometimes I work solo and other times as a part of a team handling different aspects of ideation, production and distribution.

From my experience, something that makes or breaks a project or team is clarity about a project’s purpose, scope, and the desired outcomes. When a project definition is murky, every step of the process takes longer for a thoughtful person to navigate the ambiguity.

At times…


Part 2: ES6 Classes

In JavaScript, there are several ways to use object initializers and make an object instance, from writing an object literal, to functional instantiation patterns, to ES6 classes and subclassing. Knowing how to implement every possible way is commendable. Having a solid reason why you choose a particular way gets respect.

If you are not sure about the different instantiation options or which one to choose, this two-post series provides an overview of things to consider as you decide.

The first post covers common initializers and functional instantiation patterns. This second post goes over ES6 classes.

ES6 classes

ES6 classes instantiate objects just…


Part 1: Initializers and Functional Instantiation Patterns—which way, which way… a few pointers to help you decide.

In JavaScript, there are several ways to use object initializers and make an object instance, from writing an object literal, to functional instantiation patterns, to ES6 classes and subclassing. Knowing how to implement every possible way is commendable. Having a solid reason why you choose a particular way gets respect.

If you are not sure about the different instantiation options or which one to choose, this two-post series provides an overview of things to consider as you decide.

This first post covers common initializers and functional instantiation patterns. A follow up post will go over ES6 classes.

Initializers

Just about everything…


before resorting to Stack Overflow and existential crisis

JavaScript debugging tools to know and use: Google Dev Tools, React Dev Tools, Node Inspect, Postman and Webpack

You’re staring at code and can’t figure out why! WHY is it doing this unexpected, potentially interesting — if you didn’t have a deadline — thing?

Before you abandon your approach and resort to cobbling together somewhat-related found code that might get the job done, I have three questions for you:

1. What do you expect that first expression to do?

2. Why do you expect it to do that?

3. Does it actually do it?

If you can’t answer the first two questions, I wish you luck with your copy-paste hack, BUT if you know what you expect and…


A song’s BPM (beats per minute) isn’t something I intrinsically know when I hear it. Song BPM, is a great site for solving that mystery, but you have to search by artist or song title.

While I was wishing I could tap a beat then use it to search through a genre of songs for other songs with matching tempos, it occurred to me that I could build something like that.

This tutorial is the first step in that project. It walks through how to calculate BPM from screen clicks using React. Here is a link to the demo, http://interdigitize.com/beat-match/.


I recently built an MVC-esque movie list app that tracks movies you would like to watch or have already watched. Instead of using a framework like React or Angular to build it, I used jQuery to test my understanding of MVC concepts. An overview of my setup is below.

In the code,

  • Movie models are instantiated in the addMovie function based the movie class.
  • The view is rendered and updated by functions.
  • Event listeners control the flow and call functions when a click is detected.

The Challenge

Keeping the models and view in sync was a little tricky. Initially, I wanted to…


You have heard about APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) and know some HTML, CSS and JavaScript, but you still aren’t sure how to get data from an API endpoint to appear on your webpage. If that sounds familiar, this post is for you.

I am going to walk you through building a design quote web app using the Quotes on Design API curated by Chris Coyier. This is a good API to start with because it follows RESTful protocol and doesn’t require configuring a key or promise to send or receive data. Lets get started!

First, structure the body of your HTML page.

Example code is below. Don’t forget…

Kamie Robinson

Software Engineer rooted as a Creative. Writing how-tos and about 'ahas' and 'gotchas' of making.

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